APPLE JUICE SAFETY FAQS

GERBER ARSENIC AND LEAD SAFETY

Is Gerber Apple Juice safe?
Yes, consumers can be confident that our products are safe for their children to consume. All Gerber products fully comply with U.S. laws and regulations, and our own strict standards for quality and safety.
 
Does Gerber Juice contain arsenic and lead, and why?
There may be low, or trace levels present in food and beverage products because arsenic and lead are found naturally in soil. Low levels of arsenic and lead may be present in many foods or beverages and do not pose a health risk, or represent a food safety concern at such levels.
 
All Gerber products fully comply with U.S. laws and regulations, and our own strict standards for quality and safety. Consumers can be confident that our products are safe for their children to consume.
 
How much arsenic is in Gerber Apple Juice?
We recently conducted testing to determine the levels of total arsenic in Gerber Apple Juice. Tests were conducted by two independent labs, and one Nestlé lab. Results from all three labs showed total arsenic levels were well below the FDA “level of concern” for inorganic arsenic and were compliant to the US EPA drinking water standard for arsenic.
 
Consumers can be confident that our products are safe for their children to consume.
 
How much lead is in Gerber Apple Juice?
Currently, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has established a recommended maximum level for lead in juice at 50 ppb. While the specific levels may vary, all juice samples tested by Consumer Reports, including Gerber Apple Juice, were well below this level.
 
Where does Gerber source apples for its juice?
We source all the fresh apples used for Gerber Apple Juice from the United States. We also source apple juice concentrate from Argentina, Chile, and New Zealand. Regardless of where our apples are grown or our apple juice concentrate is made, they are all carefully selected and sourced only from approved suppliers who can achieve the quality requirements we set for products designed for infants and young children.
 
Why does Gerber source apples from other countries?
We source all the fresh apples used for Gerber Apple Juice from the United States. Gerber sources apple juice concentrate from other countries to ensure a consistent and high quality supply of apple juice throughout the year.
 
Does Gerber test its products for the presence of arsenic and lead?
We test our products for the presence of naturally occurring substances, such as arsenic and lead.
We adhere to our own strict standards for quality and safety, and consumers can be confident that our products are safe for their children to consume.
 
Why is there no federally mandated limit for arsenic or lead in apple juice?
Currently, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), using scientific evaluation and risk assessment, has established a specific level of concern for inorganic arsenic in apple juice at 23 parts per billion (ppb) and a recommended maximum level for lead in juice at 50 ppb. It is important for consumers to know that a variety of substances exist naturally in the soil, including arsenic and lead. Low levels of arsenic and lead can be present in many foods or beverages and do not pose a health risk, or represent a food safety concern at such levels.
 
As stated in an FDA letter on Nov. 21, the FDA is seriously considering setting guidance or other levels for inorganic arsenic in apple juice.
 
Is organic Apple Juice safer than regular Apple Juice?
No, currently there is no data to support that organic apple juice is safer than regular apple juice. Ensuring the safety of our products is our highest priority, and we take that responsibility very seriously. Our own rigorous internal processes ensure all of our juice products – organic or otherwise – meet the high quality and safety standards that we uphold for all Gerber products.
 
Does my child need to drink juice?
Gerber supports the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) recommendations regarding juice consumption for infants and children:
  • Juice should not be introduced prior to six months of age
  • Juice should not be given to infants in bottles or easily transportable covered cups that allow them to consume juice easily throughout the day
  • Juice should not be given at bedtime
  • Juice should be limited to 4 – 6 ounces a day for children 1 – 6 years old
Your child does not need to drink juice. However, 100% fruit juice in limited amounts is a nutritious beverage and can contribute to your child’s fruit intake.
 
Is there arsenic and lead in other Gerber fruit and vegetable puree products and snacks?
There may be low, or trace levels present in food and beverage products because arsenic and lead are found naturally in soil. Low levels of arsenic and lead do not pose a health risk, or represent a food safety concern.
 
Have there been reports of children becoming sick from arsenic or lead consumed in Gerber Apple Juice?
No, there have been no reports of children becoming sick from arsenic or lead consumed in Gerber Apple Juice.
 
All Gerber Apple Juice and all Gerber products are safe to consume. All Gerber products fully comply with U.S. laws and regulations, and our own strict standards for quality and safety. Consumers can be confident that our products are safe for their children to consume.
 
At Gerber, the safety and quality of our products – and the infants and children who consume them – are our top priorities.
 
What's your point-of-view about the recommendations from Consumer Reports that Federal Officials set a total arsenic standard of 3 ppb in juice and 5 ppb limit for lead?
We understand that the FDA is reviewing their guidance levels for arsenic and lead in juice. Gerber fully supports this effort and would contribute our expertise to the development of science-based standards that further advance public health and consumer confidence.
 
What do you think about the Consumer Reports’ recommendation to limit juice intake to four to six ounces for children up to six years old and eight to 12 ounces a day for older children?
For years, we have supported the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) recommendations regarding juice consumption for infants and children: Juice should not be introduced prior to six months of age; juice should not be given to infants in bottles or easily transportable covered cups that allow them to consume juice easily throughout the day; juice should not be given at bedtime; juice should be limited to 4 – 6 ounces a day for children 1 – 6 years old; juice should be limited to 8 to 12 ounces or 2 servings per day for children 7 – 18 years old. (aap.org). The AAP juice recommendations for infants and younger children appear in many of our consumer education materials.
 

FDA REGULATION

Dr. Oz and Consumer Reports say there should be a standard or regulations regarding arsenic and lead in juices. Would Gerber support this?
Gerber fully supports the FDA and would contribute our expertise to the development of science-based standards that further advance public health and consumer confidence.
 
What is the regulated level for arsenic in water? And why is it different for juice?
While there is no regulated level for trace amounts of arsenic in juice, regulatory agencies set the 10 ppb threshold for drinking water because people consume larger amounts of water.
 
Currently the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), using scientific evaluation and risk assessment, has established a specific level of concern for inorganic arsenic in apple juice at 23 parts per billion (ppb).
 
Can you please explain parts per billion in lay terms? I need to understand what this means relative to my child.

One part per billion (ppb) equals 0.000000001 or the value of one penny compared to 10 million dollars and represents a very low, harmless trace level. All Gerber products fully comply with U.S. laws and regulations, and our own strict standards for quality and safety. Consumers can be confident that our products are safe for their children to consume.